Bat use of intertidal habitats in Swansea Bay

During 2015 BSG Ecology provided training and technical support to three Swansea University Master of Science students. This enabled them to complete research on the use of sandy and rocky shore habitats within Swansea Bay by bats. During the project BSG staff gave an initial briefing, assisted in survey design and on transect work, provided equipment and technical support in the use of Analook (for data analysis) and GIS.

Natural England Low Impact Bat Class Licence

BSG Ecology Partner Steven Betts is now a Registered Consultant, and is therefore able to rely on the Natural England Low Impact Bat Class Licence for sites that have been registered.

This aim of this new system is to provide a more efficient and proportionate approach to licensing for bats in certain circumstances. Natural England’s objective in introducing this licence is to provide a more streamlined service for developers that is appropriate to situations where effects on bats can be easily mitigated (but which nonetheless require a licence to derogate the law).

Bat Mist Netting Training, Wiltshire

Six ecologists from BSG Ecology joined Dr Ian Davidson-Watts on Tuesday 22 September for a training event that also contributed to a (Natural England licenced) long-term monitoring project at a protected hibernation and swarming site in Wiltshire.

Bats at Sea: Look North interview

BSG Ecology’s bat migration research recently featured on both BBC Radio Humberside and the BBC Look North regional news programme on 25 August. Both programmes focussed on the recording of migrating bats at sea from detectors mounted on two North Sea ferries.

Thermal Imaging surveys for bats: practical applications

Since 2014 BSG Ecology has been using thermal imaging cameras in appropriate situations to determine the presence of bats in trees, bat boxes and other structures; and to identify flight lines and foraging behaviour to better inform the assessment of impacts on rare species of bat. We have been particularly interested in how this technique can assist us in the assessment and survey of potential tree roosts, which is always a challenging task.

Rachel Taylor to address Welsh Bat Conference

Ecologist Rachel Taylor will present a talk to the Welsh Bat Conference at Stackpole, Pembrokeshire, on the subject of BSG Ecology’s Bat Migration Project (2012-2014).   Rachel’s talk is entitled “Bats on the Pembrokeshire Islands and an overview of BSG Ecology’s Bat Migration Project.”

Is the noctule bat really uncommon?

This article explores some of the challenges of assessing the significance of impacts on noctule bat Nyctalus noctula from onshore wind farms in the UK.

The article reviews discrepancies between sources with regard to the status of noctule in the UK, considers how differing conclusions relate to our own experience (from a sample of 52 sites), and questions whether the recent focus on this species in wind farm assessments is appropriate.

North Sea Ferries Bat Migration Research 2014

In 2014 we deployed bat detectors on two commercial ferries sailing routes through the southern North Sea. The two vessels were Flandria Seaways (DFDS Seaways) and the Pride of York (P&O Ferries), which sail from Felixstowe (UK) to Vlaardingen (Netherlands) and from Hull (UK) to Zeebrugge (Belgium) respectively. The aim of the study was to investigate the occurrence of bats over the North Sea, and to see if there were any clear patterns to records indicative of migration.

Pembrokeshire Islands Bat Research 2014

In 2014 we deployed bat detectors on the islands of Skomer, Skokholm and Ramsey, off the west coast of Pembrokeshire, Wales. The islands are between 0.8 km and 2.6km from the mainland.

The aims were to increase knowledge of the bat fauna and investigate evidence for migration through the identification of changes in seasonal bat activity. The detectors were set to survey from half an hour before sunset to half an hour after sunrise from spring to autumn, the most active period for bats and the peak migration seasons.

Stable Isotope Analysis provides further evidence of Nathusius’ pipistrelle migration

The extent of bat migration between continental Europe and the United Kingdom (UK) is poorly understood. BSG Ecology has been conducting studies looking at whether there is evidence of bat migration into and out of the country since early 2012.  Using static detectors at various coastal locations and on North Sea ferries, we have consistently recorded peak levels of Nathusius’ pipistrelle Pipistrellus nathusii (a migratory species of bat) activity during the migration season for the species on the continent.