Peter Newbold

Oxford: 01865 883833

Peter has been a professional ecologist since 2008 and joined BSG Ecology’s Oxford office in 2013.

Peter currently co-ordinates and undertakes a range of protected species and habitat surveys and has a strong interest in birds, mammals, reptiles and amphibians. He holds Natural England survey licences for great crested newt, dormouse, smooth snake and sand lizard, and has experience of a range of other protected species and habitats. He has worked on variety of ecological assessments including for housing developments, renewable energy, quarry proposals and restorations and Habitat Regulation Assessments.

Peter graduated from the University of Southampton with a Master’s degree in Environmental Science. His dissertation, conducted in partnership with the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB), was on the feeding strategy of Chough, and how understanding this can be used to inform future management for this species. He was subsequently employed by the RSPB, and also spent some time working for Natural England, before moving into consultancy work. The knowledge and understanding gained through working for a charity, in the public and private sectors, has given him a good grounding as a professional ecologist.

Between 2011 and 2013 Pete was seconded to EnterpriseMouchel where he worked in close collaboration with project engineers to ensure that Highways infrastructure maintenance and improvement projects were completed on closely controlled timeframes, whilst complying with environmental legislation. A key element of this was client liaison to ensure all aspects of environmental legislation were met for various technical disciplines particularly including ecology, air quality, cultural heritage, landscape, water and geology.

Peter is a full member of the Chartered Institute of Ecology and Environmental Management. Outside work Pete is involved in a range of voluntary conservation work for the Oxfordshire Mammal Group the RSPB, local Council reserves, and the local Wildlife Trusts.

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